Regina Real Estate

1377 homes for sale in Regina, SK.

Refine your Regina real estate search by price, bedroom, or type (house, townhouse, or condo). View up-to-date MLS listings in Regina.

Showing results 1 — 24 of 1377

Home Prices in Regina

The asking price of homes for sale in Regina has increased 19.23% since November last year, while the number of homes for sale has increased 1977.61%. See more Regina Home Prices & Values.

House
Median Asking Price
$314K
907 Houses
Townhouse
Median Asking Price
$285K
222 Townhouses
Condo
Median Asking Price
$227K
201 Condos

Regina MLS® Listings & Real Estate

Zolo helps you search for your dream home out of the 1377 homes for sale in Regina. Search by location with our MLS® map for Canada-wide real estate listings. Narrow down these homes by property type, price, number of bedrooms, size, keywords like "garage," and more to find Regina condos or houses for sale in Regina. With Zolo you'll be able to explore neighbourhoods in the city and easily navigate the MLS® system. Most of the city population own their homes, while 31% live in Regina rentals.

Zolo has the most comprehensive, up-to-date set of Regina real estate listings and allows you to search within the Regina MLS® system for nearby cities and neighbourhoods. Get in touch with one of our Realtors in Regina to get started on landing your dream home today! Interested in cities around Regina? Find Moose Jaw real estate as well as search for homes for sale in Weyburn and homes for sale in Grand Coulee on Zolo.

Regina City Guide

193K
Population
7.7%
Population Growth
5%
Unemployment

Regina is the 2nd-largest city in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. As the provincial capital, the city is the cultural and commercial centre for this prairie province. The city’s original name was Wascana, meaning “Buffalo Bones” in Cree. This name changed in 1882 to Regina, which is Latin for queen, in honour of Queen Victoria.

The population of the city now sits just under 236,500 people. Its population has grown by 12% since 2011, according to data collected by Statistics Canada.

While it’s been over 100 years, Regina has the distinction of being the site of Canada’s deadliest tornado. On June 30, 1912, the “Regina Cyclone” hit the growing Saskatchewan city killing 28 people. During the storm, green funnel clouds formed and touched down just south of the city before tearing through residential areas between Wascana Lake and Victoria Avenue and destroying homes and businesses across Regina up to the northern part of the city.

Other notable Canadian events that took place in the city include the trial (and execution) of Louis Riel in July 1885, the 1933 adoption of the CCF, Canada’s first social democratic party (now known as the NDP) and the election of the CFF in 1944, the first social democratic government in North America. The CCF would end up being the pioneers to numerous social programs, including the now Canada-wide national healthcare program, Medicare.

When Regina was first developed, it was a broad, flat, treeless and largely waterless piece of land. However, after much hard work, the city now has an abundance of parks and greenspace.  All of the city’s trees, shrubs and plants were hand-planted—all 300,000 of them—creating a lush environment for Regina residents. City planners also created artificial hills and reclaimed land for parks throughout the city. Plus, new subdivisions have decorative landscape lagoons, which helps combat the city’s dry continental climate.

As a prairie city, Regina is prone to climatic extremes, experiencing dry, hot summer and cold winters. The lowest temperature ever recorded was -50.0 ºC (-58ºF), while the highest recorded temperature was 43.9 ºC (111ºF).

Like the province, the city of Regina’s economy is fuelled on natural resources. Oil and natural gas, as well as potash, kaolin, sodium sulphite and bentonite, are all big players in the city’s economy. Another big economic contributor is agriculture. The Saskatchewan Wheat Pool (now known as Viterra Inc.) is still the world’s largest grain-handling co-operative and is the 8th major driver in the province’s economy.

Nearby Cities

Many buyers opt to purchase in a nearby city and commute to work. These buyers want larger homes and lots but with good commuter access to Regina’s downtown core. Good options include Emerald Park and Pilot Butte. Even cities that require a bit longer of a commute, such as Lumsden and Balgonie are good options as they offer more affordable detached homes.

City
(Top 5)
Sold under 10d Sold above asking Average sale price Active listings
1Regina 0%0%$01392

Demographics

Before buying a house in Regina, you may want to take a glimpse into the city’s demographics. Data is collected and compiled by Census Canada and creates a snapshot of the city’s residents. This snapshot can help you decide whether or not Regina is the right city for you and your family before talking to a local real estate agent.

31%
Rent
69%
Own
$882
Monthly Rent (Median)
$967
Monthly Mortgage (Median)
50,590
Total Families
$69,192
Family Income (Median)
37
Age (Median)
51%
College Educated

Commuters

To get around you may need to rely on the city’s public transit system, which is comprised of 110 buses on 16 bus routes that operate seven days a week. If not, you’ll need to rely on a car and the city’s network of highways and roads. While the Trans Canada Highway 1 is a major east-west route through the city, the primary artery is Regina’s Ring Road, a high-speed connection between the city’s eastern neighbourhoods and the communities to the north-west.

To get a better idea of how city residents commute, consider the data collected by Statistics Canada.

89%
Drive
5%
Transit
1%
Bike
5%
Walk

Local Scoop

Want to know where the locals hang out in Regina? Well, if it’s a Tuesday chances are many are lining up at the local Rainbow Theatre. A budget-brand cinema, Rainbow offers $2 Tuesdays—giving local residents a chance to check out blockbuster flicks on the big screen, while sticking to a budget.

To get into the local Regina history take a tour of the Legislative Buildings. The free tour gives you a great synopsis of Saskatchewan history and illuminates key events that helped shape this southern prairie province city. Another option is to take the by-donation tour of the Saskatchewan Government House. While you can always take the tour for free, many locals end up paying the suggested $6 per adult, or $15 per family, to help keep and maintain the home. The home was built in 1891 and is the first official residence of the Lieutenant-Governor of the Northwest Territories. The home-turned-museum gives us a glimpse into life at the Government House at the turn of the 20th-century. If you do decide to spend a day learning some local history you may want to schedule a meal at The Artful Dodger. Known to locals, this local pub and grub spot offers local talent a spot to shine, as well.

If you really want to go all touristy, consider booking a sleepover at the city’s Stone Hall Castle. This Medieval European fortress was originally built by Francis Nicholson Darke for his wife Annie, who was traumatized by the Regina Cyclone of 1912. The cost was no concern, so Francis resolved to build his wife’s new home out of the most durable materials. He imported the exact limestone used in the building of the Regina Legislative Building and employed the finest stonemasons, carpenters and artisans of his time. The result: A stone fortress complete with stone roof and a bomb shelter in the basement. The cost to tour the fortress starts at $25 per person and an overnight stay will set you back at least $1,495 per night (unless it’s your wedding night when you get half off).

For a little more of the everyday person feel, consider spending your Wednesday or Saturday morning at the local Farmer’s Market in City Square. The market is open from 9 am to 1 pm between May and October. On certain dates in July and August, the market also opens up between 5 pm and 10 pm for a taste of local treats and tunes.

In the winter, you can rent a pair of skates and cruise one of Regina’s 59 outdoor rinks (located at 41 different sites). The downtown City Square rink is the most popular. Another option is to sip tea at the Floral Conservatory. The Conservatory is operated and maintained by volunteers of the Regina Garden Associates and is considered the city’s premier indoor green space. While the displays change frequently—giving visitors a chance to see both tropical and seasonal flora—the weather is guaranteed! Keep in mind, though, this is a winter activity with the conservatory closed between June and September.

regina
The listing data is provided under copyright by the Canadian Real Estate Association. The listing data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the Canadian Real Estate Association nor Zolo.